CRCC eUNIVERSITY Disability & Chronic Conditions Courses

Diabetes: Implications for Rehabilitation Counselors

4 CE CLOCK HOURS
$100 LIST PRICE | $60 SAVINGS PLAN MEMBER PRICE

Course Objective

This course is designed to provide rehabilitation counselors information about diabetes. Workplace facilitators associated with managing diabetes and resources to be shared with clients are included in the course.

Course Description

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), over 29 million people in the United States have diabetes, up from the previous estimate of 26 million in 2010 (CDC, 2014). Every year about 1.7 million new patients are diagnosed with this disease, and one in four people with it go undiagnosed. By 2050, one in three adults in the United States could have diabetes. These individuals face an increased risk of serious health complications, such as vision loss, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure, amputation (toes, feet, or legs), and premature death. Although diabetes is a serious disease, it can be managed via physical activity, diet, and appropriate use of insulin and oral medications to lower blood sugar (glucose) levels. In 2012, direct medical care of this disease cost $176 billion, while $69 billion in indirect costs accrued from work absences, restricted activity, disability, and early death.

Identifying the common symptoms of diabetes and recognizing the importance of early diagnosis and disease management are key concepts presented in this course. The psychosocial aspects of a diagnosis of diabetes are discussed. Three case studies help you apply what you are learning.

Course Instructor

Catherine A. Marshall, PhD, CRC

Using DSM-5 and ICF Tools to Understand Client Cultural and Environmental Perspectives

4 CE CLOCK HOURS IN ETHICS
$100 LIST PRICE | $60 SAVINGS PLAN MEMBER PRICE

Course Objective

This course is intended to address the importance of incorporating the client’s perspective of the culture and society and its impact on daily living. Instruments that help clarify these factors are presented.

Course Description

When evaluating a new client, client information is heavily focused on the presenting problem. This problem is typically an area of importance to the individual and a central element in the planning process.

The individual’s personal definition of the problem and its place within the context of his or her daily life may affect the development of a workable plan of services, too.

Instruments that help clarify these factors are presented and form a structured interview guide to aid in the selection of appropriate questions. These instruments are taken from the assessment tools incorporated into the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (5th ed.; DSM-5; American Psychiatric Association, 2013) and the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF; World Health Organization).

You’ll use these instruments as you complete the learning activities in this course. These learning activities are designed to help you apply the content presented in the course and identify ways you can enhance your plan development process. Feedback is provided for each learning activity.

Course Instructors

Raymond C. Ortega, EdD, CRC, LPC
William E. Garner, RhD, CRC, LPC

Resilience and Disability

13 CE CLOCK HOURS
$325 LIST PRICE | $195 SAVINGS PLAN MEMBER PRICE

Course Objective

Provide a deeper understanding of resilience and its relevance to persons with disabilities, with a focus on developing and incorporating resilience-based skills throughout the rehabilitation counseling process to maximize client outcomes.

Course Description

Learning to cope with disability-related experiences is fundamental to being resilient. Throughout this course, you will apply your learning of resilience-based skills and factors to case scenarios where you will consider how you would encourage people with disabilities to be active participants in the cultivation of their resilience and in living a resilient-oriented lifestyle. A key component of this process is your review and examination of your own resilience skills and tendencies. By understanding your own resilience processes, you can more effectively model resilience with the people you serve.

Areas of focus include:

  • What resilience means, how it benefits people and the lives they seek, and how interpretations may differ from person to person;
  • Barriers that may inhibit one’s ability to be resilient, pursue resilience, or create the life that one seeks;
  • Building resilience among persons with disabilities through the situations they encounter;
  • Applying resilience-based skills and approaches to examine and evaluate desired impacts; and
  • Strategies and plans that effectively incorporate resilience-based skills throughout the rehabilitation counseling process.

At the conclusion of this course, you will develop a working plan as a starting point for introducing and exploring resilience throughout the rehabilitation counseling process.

Course Instructor

Susan Stuntzner, PhD, CRC, LPC

Sexuality and Disability

4 CE CLOCK HOURS
$100 LIST PRICE | $60 SAVINGS PLAN MEMBER PRICE

Course Objective

Provide the necessary framework, learning, and tools to facilitate discussion and assist individuals with disabilities in working through issues related to sex and sexuality.

Course Description

Your client asks, “Can we talk about intimate stuff?” How do you respond? Are you prepared to discuss sex and sex-related issues with your clients? For people with disabilities, sex is related to both quality of life and adjustment to disability. While clients often prefer the rehabilitation counselor to bring up the topic of sex, few graduate programs offer training on the topic.

Through nine units that each explore a different aspect of sexuality and disability, you will:

  • Identify and analyze important concepts related to sex for individuals with disabilities, such as:
    • How a person may be affected sexually after acquiring a disability;
    • When, where, and how to appropriately discuss sex and sexuality;
    • Barriers to sex and ways to alleviate those barriers; and
    • Sexual consent for individuals with intellectual disabilities.
  • Learn when it is necessary to refer your client to a specialist and identify reputable resources.
  • Understand and effectively apply the PLISSIT model.
  • Formulate plans for common sexuality-based scenarios for individuals with disabilities, including:
    • Women who are pregnant or want to become pregnant;
    • Women who are in abusive relationships;
    • Men who are concerned about functioning sexually after acquiring a disability; and
    • Men and women who would benefit from specialized sex therapy.

Course Instructor

Roxanna Pebdani, PhD, CRC

Traumatic Brain Injury, Vocational Rehabilitation, and Recreation and Leisure

7 CE CLOCK HOURS
$175 LIST PRICE | $105 SAVINGS PLAN MEMBER PRICE

Course Objective

Extend the vocational rehabilitation process with supplementary treatment modalities to provide the necessary framework and tools to help maximize vocational skill-building specific to individuals with Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI).

Course Description

Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) causes deficits in overall functioning and can have a profound impact on employment. In fact, many individuals with TBI, from mild to severe, have difficulty finding and maintaining employment. Through a critical evaluation of recreation and leisure activities, and their direct benefits to the TBI individual, rehabilitation counselors can incorporate a unique approach to maximize vocational outcomes for their TBI clients. These complementary treatment modalities – the effective use of recreation and leisure activities – may contribute to greater self-efficacy, mastery, and intrinsic motivation.

In analyzing the needs of clients who are post-TBI, this course uses the foundation of Transferable Skills Analysis (TSA) to then conduct activity analysis, to simultaneously optimize both vocational skill-building and vocational outcomes. Through combining activity and job analysis, you’ll pinpoint skills that are utilized both in recreation and leisure activities and in the employment setting. New learning is then applied to three different TBI case scenarios – mild, moderate, and severe.

You’ll enhance your rehabilitation counseling process as you select, analyze, and modify recreation and leisure activities with the client’s intended vocational goals in mind.

Course Instructors

Leah Cox Thomas, MS, CRC, LRT/CTRS
Eileen Burker, PhD, CRC